Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Patient Education

A Review of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Acute myelogenous/myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the malignant diseases of the bone marrow. In this disease, hematopoietic precursor cells become arrested in early stages of development. Typically, AML is distinguished from other blood disorders by the presence of greater than 20% blasts seen in the bone marrow.  AML has many names including acute myelocytic […]

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Heart Failure Rates

Congestive Heart Failure 2016

Our understanding of congestive heart failure has been rapidly evolving over the past decade.  Heart failure is a leading cause of mortality globally and in the US. It is the final end-point of various cardiac diseases.  When the cardiac muscles fail, hypertrophy of the cardiac muscle cells is commonly observed. This hypertrophy of cardiomyoctes is […]

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Allergies

Seasonal Allergies: Focus on Allergic Rhinitis

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the major symptoms of seasonal allergies. When the nose is exposed to an allergen, an Ig-E mediated response ensues. Characteristic symptoms include watery rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, nasal itching, and sneezing. In the US, approximately 60 million people suffer from AR or 10-30% of the adult population and 40% of […]

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Infectious Disease

Tick-Borne Diseases: Tick Paralysis

Across the globe, there are more than 40 species that cause tick paralysis. While only five of those species live in North America, the common deer tick is one of them and is found in any area where there are ticks. In the US, thousands of livestock and domestic animals have been killed by tick […]

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Parent holding child hand

Eight Myths About Vaccines that Still Worry Parents

From government conspiracies to autism, vaccine outreach programs have been repeatedly called into suspicion. The long-circulating myth that vaccines cause autism, for example, resulted from research published in The Lancet, one of the world’s oldest and best known general medical journals, and while the author of that research was later found to have fabricated his […]

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germs infectious disease

The Battle Is On: Humanity vs. Pathogens in the Age of Antibiotic Resistance

In the twentieth century, one of the greatest weapons in the war against infectious diseases was created: antibiotics. With this powerful scythe of medicine, bacteria were decimated and humanity slowly gained control over the battlefield. Bacteria lost its killing power and humans lived to older ages. In fact, bacteria’s virulent characteristics were suppressed and they […]

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woman crying by bed

Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA): Diagnosis in the Midst of Depression

Pseudobulbaa affect (PBA) typically presents as episodes of uncontrollable laughing or crying that is out of context to the current social situation. The patient’s emotional expression is incongruent to their emotional state. Usually, PBA is seen in the setting of other neurologic diseases such as ALS, Parkinson’s disease, Alzeihmer’s dementia, stroke, progressive MS, brain tumors, […]

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Heart

PCSK9 Inhibitors and Their Role in Lipid Management

The discovery of the relationship between lipids and cardiovascular disease was first made in the 1960s. Following this, an urgent need was filled by the founding of lipid lowering medications, with statins being the gold standard of therapy. However, the consequences of lipid disorders and cardiovascular disease remain prevalent despite this knowledge. Patients with familial […]

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Infectious Disease

Tick-Borne Disease: Update in Lyme Disease

Sitting around the table with my medical students discussing our recently diagnosed child with Lyme disease, our discussion focused on the need for early diagnosis.  While this particular patient was caught fairly early in her disease based on symptoms, the diagnosis remains elusive for many. Blood tests do not detect early stages of the disease […]

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rare disease zebra

Rare Diseases: Why We All Need to be Aware

While rare diseases are uncommon, there are a multitude of them. In the US, there are approximately 7,000 diseases that are considered to be rare. It is approximated that there are nearly 300,000,000 patients around the world who are diagnosed with a rare disease. In the US, a rare disease is defined as any disease […]

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Prepare for doctor appointment

Colorectal Cancer Around the Globe

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the US, as well as around the world. Additionally, it remains one of the leading causes of cancer deaths as well. Our knowledge of this deadly disease increased exponentially in recent years and we now have screening tests and a plethora of treatment modalities. Yet, […]

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doctor helping diabetes patient

Diabetes Mellitus and motivational interviewing

Motivational interviewing is a form of counseling developed by William R. Miller, PhD and Professor Steven Rollinick in 1983. First devised to help in the treatment of alcoholics, motivational interviewing can serve as a framework for evoking any motivation to change and has been used for many conditions including substance abuse, smoking, obesity and diabetes. […]

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obesity

The Evolving Genesis of Obesity

Over the past many years or decades, people believed that obesity was caused by a misbalance of calories: obese patients consume more calories that they expend. While this is true in many cases, it is not the complete picture. Recent research is discovering a whole host of causes that contribute to obesity and it is […]

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sport concussion

Concussion in Children: Returning to Play

In my practice, I see it frequently that a coach allowed a patient to return to play after suffering a concussion and still symptomatic. The popular movie, “Concussion” starring Will Smith, brought to light the grave damage recurrent concussions can cause on the brain to the general American population. Yet, for some, the future neurological […]

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lung

The Genetics of Lung Cancer

Everyone is aware of the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. However, recent research is showing strong genetic contributors to the development of these cancers. Even among smokers, genetics appear to play some role. Not every smoker develops lung cancer and not everyone who develops lung cancer smokes. Here, we’ll review the genetics of […]

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global

GASTRIC CANCER: A GLOBAL VIEW

Gastric cancer, also known as stomach cancer, remains an aggressive cancer around the globe. Over the past several decades, there has been a slight decrease in incidence, yet it remains the fourth most common cancer and the second deadliest across the world.  Some factors that are thought to be responsible for the declining incidence include […]

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patient and doctor

Breast Cancer in Men: Where we are in 2016

While everyone is aware that breast cancer in woman exists, many do not know men can be similarly afflicted. Breast cancer in women has its own awareness month (October) and its own symbol of awareness, the pink ribbon. Breast cancer in men, on the other hand, do not even have treatments tailored to them but […]

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CDC Zika PlatformQ Health

CDC Zika Update: Joanne Cono, MD ScM Clinical Session

Zika Virus is in the news, people are concerned about this epidemic expanding through the U.S. protectorates and threatening the continental U.S. and Hawaii. We’re at the early stages of understanding this virus and there is much misinformation and uncertainty surrounding this new global pathogenic threat. While the anxiety is wide-spread, the Center for Disease […]

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biosimilars

The Advancement of Biosimilars: A New Frontier in Medicine

In this recent CME offering from ClinicalSeriesLive, “The Advancement of Biosimilars: A New Frontier in Medicine, Clinical Applications and Concerns Regarding Biosimilar Products,” viewers gain valuable insight into the testing, approval, and use of biosimilars or treatment of various diseases. As of the production of the video, the only biosimilar approved by the FDA is […]

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Diabetes Injectable Medications

2016 Screening Guidelines for Type 2 Diabetes

The ADA and AACE just jointly released 2016 screening guidelines for Type 2 Diabetes; they cast a significantly wider net. They now recommend screening everyone over the age of 45.  In addition, they are eliminating the term “diabetic” to describe a person living with diabetes.  Dr. Linda Girgis, MD, family practitioner, talks about the impact the new guidelines will […]

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